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Posts Tagged ‘United States Congress

The Future of the New Republicans

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So the Republicans just won a landslide in the midterm election. Can’t say it was very unexpected, but it’s important to note that it’s apparently the biggest chunk taken into Congress since 1948. But what will the future bring these newly elected Republicans in the House and Senate?

First of all, they need to understand that the people means no bullshit. Many new candidates got elected only because of all the individuals across America who wanted to see changes in the ways of government, by strongly cutting government spending and by making notable tax cuts for all Americans.  Second of all, they will have to make a lot of effort in repealing Obamacare as quick as possible. If not completely, at least remove the most important negative portions of the bill that will hurt low and middle income Americans the most. The mandate instantly comes to mind.

But what if this new generation of Republicans won’t stand true to their word? What if they get sucked into the political establishment machine? Then things will not look good in 2012. It’s difficult to understand how voter frustration can possibly show itself in the face of being disappointed and screwed over by both parties at the same time, but it surely is the setup for a certain win for Obama. He will be able to point to the Republicans for failing to stand up and do what they were told to do by the country, and since Republicans are sure to mess up any attempts from Obama, he will also blame them for being too partisan and for failing to take part in leading the country. He will try to divide and conquer Republicans if there is any weakness among them.

What do I think? The new generation of Republican Tea Party candidates need to stick together and prove to their voters that they are going to Washington to do what they promised. In my view they should begin already now to form ties, to plan on cooperation and form a faction within the Republican Party that will stay strong on their issues in an effort to change the hearts and minds of the party as a whole, so that they can prove to America that they mean business. If old Republicans will tremble in fear over the new Republican take-over of their establishment stability and if old Republicans will move towards moderation and cooperation with Democrats, then voters will know for sure who to kick out in 2012, and that’s when the small government movement has the best chance of rising to power. Along with a true small government candidate for Presidency that has always stayed true to his ideals since the day he came into politics, and you will have the recipe for the biggest spending cuts the world has ever since.

And to end on an untraditional low note, there were some sad news from the elections: Barney Frank, Harry Reid and Nancy Pelosi will still be with us for another term. I guess not everyone in Massachusetts’ 4th district, Nevada and California’s 8th district came to their senses.

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Written by Morten Rolland

November 4, 2010 at 12:53 am

A Little Historical Afterthought

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Time: 1995. Place: Washington. Event: 104th U.S. Congress, 1st Session, Vote# 98

Fronted by the Republican Party in 1995 as part of the Contract With America, a vote had passed in the House of Representatives for an amendment of the Constitution that would require the federal government to keep a balanced budget unless it was sanctioned by a 3/5 majority vote in both houses of Congress. It were to be rejected in the Senate, where the amendment was 2 votes short of the 2/3 majority vote needed.

What do I think? 33 Democrats voted against the amendment out of spite after the Republican landslide of 1994, and 2 Republicans voted against the amendment out of political stupidity. With a federal government literally unable to issue deficit spending budgets, this amendment could have kept the Bush administration from waging expensive undeclared wars and could have kept the Obama administration from introducing gross economic interventions. This means that a coming depression likely worse than the Great Depression of the 1930s could have been avoided had it not been for 35 individuals in Washington. Thanks.